I would like to thank Rob for his excellent expertise and assistance with Health and Safety issues. He was extremely efficient with answering any queries and delivering the required documents very quickly! Would certainly recommend this company and will be using these services again in the future.

HVC Ltd

Clearwater Safety Group Limited provide professional but realistic business risk management advice to SME’s across East and West Sussex and Hampshire, through Surrey into South London and over into Essex and Kent.

We have four divisions:

Clearwater safety Clearwater fire Clearwater events Clearwater business

Clearwater Safety specialises in general health & safety which includes construction, CDM and training.

Clearwater Fire carries out Fire Risk Assessments, Fire Management Strategies, determines alarm equirements and associated activities.

Clearwater Events help organisers of public events with their safety management, including working with SAG’s.

Clearwater Business works with directors to create business continuity or disaster recovery plans.

The Clearwater Safety Group firmly believes that the management and control of risks belong at the very core of all business activities. Looking after the health and well-being of your staff makes sound business sense – less time off due to sickness or injuries, no need to train replacement staff, and no fines or compensation payments. Planning for the unexpected is looking after your business.

 

Mission Statement

Clearwater Safety specialises in general health & safety which includes construction, CDM and training.Clearwater Fire carries out Fire Risk Assessments, Fire Management Strategies, determines alarm requirements and associated activities. Clearwater Events help organisers of public events with their safety management, including working with SAG’s. Clearwater Business works with directors to create business continuity or disaster recovery plans. The Clearwater Safety Group firmly believes that the management and control of risks belong at the very core of all business activities. Looking after the health and well-being of your staff makes sound business sense – less time off due to sickness or injuries, no need to train replacement staff, and no fines or compensation payments. Planning for the unexpected is looking after your business.

Clearwater Safety Group Ltd
Clearwater Safety Group Ltd
Driver eye care – minimising risk
Stark Government statistics show that up to a third of all road traffic accidents involve someone who is working at the time. Jim Lythgow, Director of Strategic Alliances at Specsavers Corporate Eyecare, explains the law around driver eye care and how firms can minimise the risk to their workers.
DrivingWith the Department for Transport recording 1,784 reported road deaths in 2018, a conservative estimate would, therefore, suggest that in excess of 500 deaths per year involve someone driving for work purposes. A figure corroborated by the Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents (RoSPA).

HSE statistics show that there were 147 workplace fatalities in the UK in 2018/2019. This figure does not include deaths on the road. These figures show that driving is clearly one of the most hazardous tasks performed for work.

What can be done to minimise road deaths?
There are numerous options for safety managers to implement safety checks on vehicles, plan safer journeys, make work schedules reasonable, etc, but what about the drivers themselves? Driver checks and training go a long way, but perhaps the most basic first step, that can be overlooked, is to ensure that the driver has eyesight that is adequate for the task.

Our recent research has shown that nearly half (45%) of employers worry employees’ eyesight is not adequate for driving. This represents a concerning number whose employees – and company reputation – may be at risk.

Driver eye care – the law
The standards for driving vision are well-defined, but arguably, are not well enforced. The law states that drivers must be able to read, with glasses or contact lenses if necessary, a car number plate (of the new style made after 1 September 2001) from a distance of 20 metres. Most people are aware of the ‘number plate test’ as it is carried out on the day they undertake their practical driving test.

Drivers may not be aware, however, that the law states that they must also meet the minimum eyesight standard for driving by having a visual acuity of at least decimal 0.5 (6/12) measured on the Snellen scale (with glasses or contact lenses if necessary). Drivers must also have an adequate field of vison, as ascertained through tests by an optician.

The problem is, firstly, that the number plate test only takes place once, at the very start of a driving career, and secondly, that the equivalent tests by an optician are not obligatory but the requirements must still be met. In practice, this means that most drivers may only be asked to prove that their eyesight is adequate after an incident has taken place.

Workplace regulations
Much of the issue may well be the perception that driver eyesight is the responsibility of the driver alone. While the law itself is lacking, the Health and Safety requirements are entirely prescriptive.

The Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974 makes it clear that employers have as much responsibility to those who drive for work purposes as they do for employees undertaking any other working task. The act obliges employers to: ‘take appropriate steps to ensure the health and safety of their employees and others who may be affected by their activities when at work. This includes the time when they are driving or riding at work, whether this is in a company or hired vehicle, or in the employee’s own vehicle.’

It is, therefore, part of the employer’s duty of care, to employees who drive in the course of their work, to ensure that every reasonable action has been taken towards their safety. This surely includes confirming that they are able to see adequately for the task.

Moreover, this duty of care relates to all drivers, whether they drive a company car and driving is their main or sole working task, or if they occasionally drive their own vehicle to the post office or an off-site meeting.

Employers would be wise to view driver eyesight as no less than a matter of joint responsibility.

Safety measures
If the law itself is confusing in how it actually relates to the individual taking eye tests, the HSE regulations at least are unambiguous. For the safety manager it may, at first, appear to be a minefield. The simple solution though is to provide eye care for all, in one blanket scheme.

This may seem an expensive way to ensure that drivers are covered but eye care is generally a low-cost provision and the additional benefits can far out way the initial overhead.

There are many added health benefits to eye care, above and beyond those of checking adequate vision. These include checking the health of the eyes but also the ability to detect the signs of other, wider health conditions including diabetes, cardiovascular disease, risk of stroke, etc.

Added to these positive health benefits, and the morale boost of offering a valued employee benefit, is the advantage of helping to ensure that drivers are fit for the task. Even if insurance covers the main costs of an accident, there are likely to be many additional expenses and uninsured loses. Of course, the cost to the company reputation and the individuals involved may be beyond monetary value.
Clearwater Safety Group Ltd
Clearwater Safety Group Ltd
Director struck off after serious safety breaches
The director of a waste transfer company has been found guilty and banned from being a company director after knowingly exposing employees to serious unsafe working conditions.
Telescopic handlerIn November 2018, despite a conviction for transport related health and safety offences following a fatal incident in 2013, and further enforcement action in 2017 for using a poorly maintained and damaged telehandler, Zarif Mohammed allowed the continued use of the same seriously damaged machine on the waste transfer site in Kensulate Park, Blackburn.

The HSE’s investigation found the telehandler was being used without working reversing lights, a camera or mirrors, which presented a serious risk of people being struck and seriously injured as the driver would not be able to see adequately when reversing the vehicle.

Zarif Mohammed of Angela Street, Blackburn, pleaded guilty under Section 37 to breaching section 2(1) of the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974. Mohammed was sentenced to six months imprisonment suspended for 18 months, and 190 hours of unpaid work with a further six rehabilitation days. He was also struck off from working as a company director for five years.

SHP recently reported how waste disposal has the highest fatality at work rate of any industrial sector.

Speaking after the hearing, HSE Inspector Steven Boyd said: “Mr Mohammed had been previously convicted by HSE following a fatality at a previous company of which he was a director and then was served additional enforcement by HSE on a visit to a new company of which he was a director.

“Despite this, Mr Mohammed allowed serious unsafe conditions to prevail, presenting a high risk of persons being killed or seriously injured.

“Workplace transport incidents remain a major cause of fatal and serious injuries in the waste and recycling industry. It is important that vehicles are maintained in a safe condition.”
Clearwater Safety Group Ltd
Clearwater Safety Group Ltd
Rope ladder in a bag was care home’s ‘fire escape’
More than 16,000 buildings — including schools and hospitals — were rated unsatisfactory by local fire services

More than 16,000 buildings in England, including hospitals, care homes, schools and tower blocks, failed fire safety inspections last year.

One residential care home that was successfully prosecuted last year was found to have a rope ladder in a bag on an upper floor as a fire escape for its elderly residents.

The Lavender House Residential Home in Alsager, Cheshire, whose patients included some with dementia, admitted eight breaches of fire safety regulations when it was prosecuted last year. It was fined £40,000.
Clearwater Safety Group Ltd
Clearwater Safety Group Ltd
A leading construction company has been fined following an incident in which a worker was killed when a dumper truck overturned.

Chelmsford Magistrates’ Court heard that on 3 October 2016, David Scott Green, a groundworker working for Rose Builders Ltd, was manoeuvring a 9T front tipping dumper truck on a spoil heap to offload top soil at the Summers Park Development site in Colchester, Essex.. He lost control of the truck which toppled forward and came to rest upside down at the base of the spoil heap. A colleague noticed the overturned truck and ran over to assist, but Mr Green had sustained a serious head injury during the fall and died on scene.

An investigation by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) found major deficiencies in the management of tipping operations on the spoil heaps. The investigation established that the operation was not properly planned; drivers were not given instruction or training on how to safely operate vehicles and tip on spoil heaps, and the job itself was poorly supervised. The victim did not have his seat belt fastened and the investigation confirmed that this was common practice on the site.

Rose Builders Ltd of Riverside House, East Lawford, Essex pleaded guilty to breaching Sections 2 (1) and 3(1) of the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974. The company has been fined £225,000 and ordered to pay costs of £11,822.90.

Speaking after the hearing, HSE inspector Kasia Urbaniak said, “This was a tragic and wholly avoidable incident, caused by the failure of the employer to assess the risk related to tipping operations, implement safe systems of work, and failure to ensure that such systems were communicated to groundworkers and were followed.”
Clearwater Safety Group Ltd
Clearwater Safety Group Ltd
The financial cost of not having a Fire Assessment ...

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