I would like to thank Rob for his excellent expertise and assistance with Health and Safety issues. He was extremely efficient with answering any queries and delivering the required documents very quickly! Would certainly recommend this company and will be using these services again in the future. HVC Ltd

Clearwater Safety Group Limited provide professional but realistic business risk management advice to SME’s across East and West Sussex and Hampshire, through Surrey into South London and over into Essex and Kent.

We have four divisions:

Clearwater safety Clearwater fire Clearwater events Clearwater business

Clearwater Safety specialises in general health & safety which includes construction, CDM and training.

Clearwater Fire carries out Fire Risk Assessments, Fire Management Strategies, determines alarm equirements and associated activities.

Clearwater Events help organisers of public events with their safety management, including working with SAG’s.

Clearwater Business works with directors to create business continuity or disaster recovery plans.

The Clearwater Safety Group firmly believes that the management and control of risks belong at the very core of all business activities. Looking after the health and well-being of your staff makes sound business sense – less time off due to sickness or injuries, no need to train replacement staff, and no fines or compensation payments. Planning for the unexpected is looking after your business.

 

Mission Statement

Clearwater Safety specialises in general health & safety which includes construction, CDM and training.Clearwater Fire carries out Fire Risk Assessments, Fire Management Strategies, determines alarm requirements and associated activities. Clearwater Events help organisers of public events with their safety management, including working with SAG’s. Clearwater Business works with directors to create business continuity or disaster recovery plans. The Clearwater Safety Group firmly believes that the management and control of risks belong at the very core of all business activities. Looking after the health and well-being of your staff makes sound business sense – less time off due to sickness or injuries, no need to train replacement staff, and no fines or compensation payments. Planning for the unexpected is looking after your business.

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This was completely preventable.

Horrific injuries due to DSEAR failures
A company specialising in spray foam insulation services has been fined after an inexperienced worker suffered severe burns while attempting to refuel petrol powered equipment.
On 11 January 2015, workers at Greenseal Insulation Ltd were spraying insulation into a ceiling cavity of a retail outlet. The foam spraying equipment was installed in a van parked outside the premises. When foam ceased from the spray gun, one of the operatives entered the van to refuel the equipment. A jerry can was fixed with straps within the compartment containing a compressor and generator (both petrol operated). The worker took the jerry can, opened it and petrol sprayed all over him and the compartment. Ignition followed immediately, covering him in flames.

Coma
Following the event he was in a coma in hospital for three months and subsequently spent over a year in hospital.

Investigating, the HSE found that Greenseal failed to ensure that risk from dangerous substances, namely petrol, was either eliminated or reduced so far as is reasonably practicable.

The HSE advise that in order to minimise the risk, the company could have taken a number of reasonably practicable actions, including the use of diesel powered spray foam equipment or reducing the frequency of refuelling by installing a larger fuel tank or tanks. Refilling could then be reduced to once a day and taken place at the beginning of the day when the equipment was cool and not in operation.

The potential for spilling petrol could have been reduced by storing it away from sources of heat and confining it to smaller containers or by using a non-spilling fuel delivery nozzle.

Fined
Greenseal Insulation Ltd of 45 Wycombe Road, Birmingham, B28 9EN pleaded guilty to breaching Regulation 6 of the Dangerous Substances and Explosive Atmospheres Regulations (DSEAR) 2002. The company was fined £40,000 and ordered to pay costs of £11,779.

Speaking after the hearing HSE inspector Gabriella Dimitrov said: “This was the worker’s second day on the job. He suffered horrific injuries due to the company’s failure to adequately consider the risks from refuelling and implementing safer alternatives to the system of work requiring refuelling petrol powered equipment every two hours.”
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Don't blame elf and safety. This is ridiculous!!!😡

HSE blasts school tree felling decision
The Health and Safety Executive has criticised schools that “hide behind non-existent” healthy and safety regulations, after a primary school was given the green light to fell a 150-year old chestnut true.

St John’s Primary School in Knaphill, Surrey, won the right to cut down the 18-metre high tree, following a meeting of Woking Borough Council’s planning committee last month when a proposed tree preservation order was rejected.
Headteacher’s claims

The committee reports show that the school’s headteacher, Sarah May, had written to the councillors, objecting to the order, partly on the grounds of health and safety.

According to the committee report, Ms May said area surrounding the tree has to be closed to the removal fallen chestnuts in order to “ensure the health and safety of the children”.

And her letter also warned leafs from the tree cause a “slip hazard if left on the ground” and bird droppings have caused “an impact on the provision for children within the play area”.
HSE comment

But commenting on the issue, a spokesperson for the HSE said: “It seems school and councils still regularly hide behind non-existent health and safety regulations to excuse all kinds of questionable decisions. “Through initiatives like Mythbusters, the public are increasingly aware that health and safety is simply used as a catch all phrase in these cases, and people who make these decisions increasingly open themselves up to ridicule.

“Here at HSE, we like to think that chestnuts have fallen from trees for millennia and leaves do indeed get wet and slippery, it is nature, and is likely continue for some time yet! However, while it is nature, it certainly isn’t health and safety, which is a set of laws designed to prevent death, serious injury and ill-health in the workplace, not eradicate any risk at all from people’s lives.”
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Prison sentence and £50,000 fine in roof fall case

A Preston egg production company and a joinery sub-contractor have been fined after a worker fell through a roof.
The employee of T& J Leigh had been helping the joinery contractor Harry Jackson to re-roof an old feed mill building when he fell five metres through a gap, to the concrete floor below causing serious head and arm injuries.

Investigating the incident, which took place at Ghyll View Farm in Longton on 1 November 2016, the HSE found the roof work was not properly planned with no measures in place to prevent or mitigate a fall through or from the roof.

T & J Leigh (a partnership) of Ghyll View Farm pleaded guilty to breaching Section 2(1) of the Health and Safety at Work etc act 1974 and was fined a total of £50,000 with costs of £2,855.32.

Harry Jackson of Much Hoole pleaded guilty to breaching Section 3 (2) of the Health and Safety at Work etc act 1974 and was given a 16 week prison sentence, suspended for 12 months. He was also ordered to carry out 150 hours unpaid work and pay costs of £2,855.32.

Speaking after the hearing, HSE inspector Steven Boyd said: “This avoidable incident resulted in serious injuries, a fall from this distance could easily have been fatal.

“Roof work should always be properly planned with measures put in place to prevent a dangerous fall.

“Companies commissioning roof work should make reasonable checks regarding the competence of a contractor to undertake work at height safely”
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£100k fine after apprentice falls from scaffold
A scaffolding company has been sentenced for safety breaches after a 16-year-old apprentice joiner fell approximately four metres from a scaffold platform.

Sheffield Magistrates’ Court was told how, on 6 September 2016, the apprentice was passing roof tiles from the loading bay to a colleague on the scaffold when he caught his foot in a gap between the scaffold platform and the loading bay. The apprentice fell backwards under a single guard rail to the ground below, sustaining injuries including a fractured cheekbone, broken wrist and injuries to his ribs. He also required 13 stitches for a deep cut above his left eye.

The HSE’s investigation found that the loading bay edge protection did not include an intermediate guard-rail or toe board.

Bland Scaffolding Ltd of Old Ship House, Wath Road, Elsecar pleaded guilty to breaching Regulation 8(a) of the Work at Height Regulations 2005 and was fined £100,000 and ordered to pay £918 in costs.

After the hearing, HSE inspector Trisha Elvy commented: “This case highlights the importance of following well known industry guidance to design and erect scaffolding in a safe manner, a fall from this height could have easily been fatal.”
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5 months ago

Clearwater Safety Group Ltd

Oh dear. Saw these guys this morning in central London decorating a tree. I'm not sure but I don't think having a ladder horizontally counts as a proper platform lol🤔 ... See MoreSee Less

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5 months ago

Clearwater Safety Group Ltd

Quality domestic scaffolding...🤔 ... See MoreSee Less

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A testimonial from a satisfied client to my colleague who introduced me.

I am writing to express my thanks for your kind introduction to Rob Slater of Clearwater Safety Group Limited. We have enjoyed the benefit of the services of Airtight for many years now and this introduction was very welcome. As the individual in charge of Health & Safety for my firm, I felt the need for a review of our existing policies and procedures with regards to Health & Safety. With up to 85 staff in our offices at any one time, this is an area of great importance. At our initial meeting, Rob was able to give me very clear guidance on the legal requirements and demonstrated excellent technical competence in his field. Rob followed up on that meeting and gave me a concise quotation covering the areas of our policies and procedures that needed to be addressed. Crucially, as part of his engagement. Rob acts as a named ‘Competent Person’ as required by law, which is reassuring for me as a business owner. In my dealings with Rob, I have found him to be punctual, reliable and importantly, very practical given the context of our ‘low risk’ office environment. I would have no hesitation in continuing to recommend the services of both Airtight and Clearwater to my business contacts. With kind regards Yours sincerely, Craig Manser BSc(Hons) ACA
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Inadequate planning led to fork lift crush injury

An employee’s foot was crushed by a falling metal grid weighing a tonne, and suffered a broken foot which led to the amputation of three toes.

Chesterfield Magistrates’ Court was told how, on 15 December 2016, Nicholas Jenkin, an employee of welding and fabrication firm Swadlincote Aluminium and Welding Co Ltd, had been instructed to paint several metal truck wash grids when one of the metal grids, weighing a tonne, slipped through the forks of a forklift and landed on his foot, crushing it.
Failure to plan

The Health and Safety Executive found that the company had failed to properly plan the task or ensure the forklift driver had received adequate training to fully operate the vehicle. The company also failed to ensure a safe system of work was in place, such as the use of a sling on the forklift truck, which would have stopped the metal grid from slipping through the forks.

Swadlincote Aluminium and Welding Co Ltd, of Unit 3 Suttons Business Park, Swadlincote, pleaded guilty to breaching Section 2 (1) of the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974. The company was fined £4,400 and ordered to pay costs of £860.40

Speaking after the hearing Health and Safety Executive Inspector David Keane said: “This injury could have easily been prevented had thorough planning been carried out.

“Employers should make sure they properly assess and apply effective control measures to minimise the risk from injury while operating fork lift trucks.”
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Gross negligence manslaughter: ‘Precedent set’ as technician jailed in gate installation case

The house on Field Lane before renovation – including the gates
A technician who fitted an automated gate to the garden of a house near Norwich has been jailed for manslaughter after it fell onto the home owner and killed her.

Jill Lunn, 56, died in April 2013, when the automatic gate fell on her at her home in Blofield Heath, near Norwich.

When the remote-controlled automatic mechanism failed, Mrs Lunn tried to pull the 300kg iron gate closed. However, safety-stop devices had not been fitted to prevent it sliding off a steel track on the ground when opened by hand.

The gate was installed by Robert Churchyard, 52, who was working for Automated Garage Doors & Gates Ltd. He had worked for the company for 20 years. Both he and the company were found guilty of safety offences at Norwich Crown Court in September. They were sentenced yesterday.

Churchyard was sentenced to three and a half years in prison for manslaughter by gross negligence; the company was fined £12,000 for breaching the Supply of Machinery (Safety) Regulations 2008.

According to the Door and Hardware Federation (DHF), the case sets a precedent with regards to the future of safe automated gate installation and maintenance.

DHF general manager Michael Skelding said: “This sentencing serves as a stark warning to everybody involved in the automated gate sector that they must ensure all doors and gates are checked for safety against current standards and regularly maintained by properly trained specialists. As this court case clearly demonstrates, both individuals and companies could face prosecution in the event of an accident.”
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NewsWorldEurope
Florence tourist death: Falling masonry kills Spanish visitor to Basilica di Santa Croce

Police stand inside Santa Croce Basilica where a 52-year-old Spanish tourist was killed after being struck by masonry EPA
Falling masonry in one of Florence's most famous churches killed a 52-year-old tourist from Spain on Thursday, the Italian news agency ANSA reported.

The tourist and his wife were visiting the Basilica of Santa Croce, one of the Renaissance city's top tourist attractions, where such Italian luminaries as Michelangelo, Galileo Galilei and Niccolo Machiavelli are buried.

ANSA says he was struck in the head by a decorative element that dropped from a height of 20 meters (66 feet) in one of the church's aisles.

According to media reports the stone fragment was about 15 centimeters by 15 centimeters (six inches by six inches) and gave support to a beam.

Authorities were checking the stability of the gothic-era church, which was expected to remain closed to visitors at least through Friday.

Neither the Culture Ministry in Rome, officials at the church or police were immediately available to provide additional details.
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