I would like to thank Rob for his excellent expertise and assistance with Health and Safety issues. He was extremely efficient with answering any queries and delivering the required documents very quickly! Would certainly recommend this company and will be using these services again in the future. HVC Ltd

Clearwater Safety Group Limited provide professional but realistic business risk management advice to SME’s across East and West Sussex and Hampshire, through Surrey into South London and over into Essex and Kent.

We have four divisions:

Clearwater safety Clearwater fire Clearwater events Clearwater business

Clearwater Safety specialises in general health & safety which includes construction, CDM and training.

Clearwater Fire carries out Fire Risk Assessments, Fire Management Strategies, determines alarm equirements and associated activities.

Clearwater Events help organisers of public events with their safety management, including working with SAG’s.

Clearwater Business works with directors to create business continuity or disaster recovery plans.

The Clearwater Safety Group firmly believes that the management and control of risks belong at the very core of all business activities. Looking after the health and well-being of your staff makes sound business sense – less time off due to sickness or injuries, no need to train replacement staff, and no fines or compensation payments. Planning for the unexpected is looking after your business.

 

Mission Statement

Clearwater Safety specialises in general health & safety which includes construction, CDM and training.Clearwater Fire carries out Fire Risk Assessments, Fire Management Strategies, determines alarm requirements and associated activities. Clearwater Events help organisers of public events with their safety management, including working with SAG’s. Clearwater Business works with directors to create business continuity or disaster recovery plans. The Clearwater Safety Group firmly believes that the management and control of risks belong at the very core of all business activities. Looking after the health and well-being of your staff makes sound business sense – less time off due to sickness or injuries, no need to train replacement staff, and no fines or compensation payments. Planning for the unexpected is looking after your business.

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NewsWorldEurope
Florence tourist death: Falling masonry kills Spanish visitor to Basilica di Santa Croce

Police stand inside Santa Croce Basilica where a 52-year-old Spanish tourist was killed after being struck by masonry EPA
Falling masonry in one of Florence's most famous churches killed a 52-year-old tourist from Spain on Thursday, the Italian news agency ANSA reported.

The tourist and his wife were visiting the Basilica of Santa Croce, one of the Renaissance city's top tourist attractions, where such Italian luminaries as Michelangelo, Galileo Galilei and Niccolo Machiavelli are buried.

ANSA says he was struck in the head by a decorative element that dropped from a height of 20 meters (66 feet) in one of the church's aisles.

According to media reports the stone fragment was about 15 centimeters by 15 centimeters (six inches by six inches) and gave support to a beam.

Authorities were checking the stability of the gothic-era church, which was expected to remain closed to visitors at least through Friday.

Neither the Culture Ministry in Rome, officials at the church or police were immediately available to provide additional details.
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Emergency Evacuation from High Rise Buildings

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Fire Safety North | 10 - 11 October 2017 | EventCity Manchester
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Student lettings firm fined £150,000 for fire failings

13 February 2017

A NOTTINGHAM-based student lettings company has been ordered to pay £190,000 in fines and costs after multiple fire safety breaches were identified at a site housing 23 residents.
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Nottinghamshire Fire and Rescue Service (NFRS) visited the accommodation run by Nottingham Student Lettings Limited at Castle Gate and found that no suitable risk assessment was in place. There was also no fire detection system, emergency lighting or safe means of escape from the premises as the only way into the building was via a staircase that had an industrial laundry on one of its landings.
On 1 October 2013, NFRS issued a Prohibition Notice to Robert Singh, director of Nottingham Student Lettings, which banned the premises from being occupied until remedial work was carried out. NFRS gave Singh an extended period to comply until March 2014 but he failed to make improvements and ignored the notice.
Nottingham Student Lettings appeared at Nottingham Crown Court on 19 January and pleaded guilty to five breaches of the Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005. It was fined £150,000 and ordered to pay costs of £40,000. Singh was also handed a three-month prison sentence, suspended for 12 months, and ordered to pay £5,000 in costs.

The Nottingham Post, reports Judge Stuart Rafferty as warning that if a fire had occurred in the building, death was not simply highly probable, but an “inevitability”. He said: “It could not be said within any degree of realism to have been a safe building. It was far from it. The risk of death was not theoretical, it could well have occurred.”

Speaking after the hearing, NFRS station manager Tom Clark said: “Regrettably, not only did Mr Singh put the young people living at his property at serious risk in the event of a fire, he refused to follow the advice of fire inspection officers in how he could make the appropriate improvements to remove the risks, and meet current fire safety legislation.“
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Hotelier in dock for fire safety breaches

17 March 2017

A HOTEL in East Sussex has been prosecuted after a member of the public tipped off authorities that the building was unsafe.
[hotel room]

In October 2015, East Sussex Fire and Rescue Service (ESFRS) received a complaint that the Royal Victoria Hotel in St Leonard’s was offering accommodation that was not of sufficient standard. Inspectors from ESFRS visited the hotel and found a number of fire safety failings, which included fire doors that offered inadequate protection in the event of a fire. ESFRS issued an enforcement notice to the owner of the 52 room hotel, Dr Woo Sueng Shin, but he failed to make the necessary improvements within the agreed time period.

Shin appeared at Hastings Magistrates’ Court on 24 February and pleaded guilty to breaching the Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005, for contravening an enforcement notice. He was ordered to pay a fine of £1,174 and full costs of £4,264.

In sentencing, the Magistrates commented that he had ignored reminders regarding the outstanding work over an extended period of time and had misled the fire service when he wrote to them and advised them that the work had been completed. Inspectors later found that this was not the case.

ESFRS group manager for business safety Richard Fowler said: “It is an expectation that those who are in the hospitality industry place fire safety high on their agenda and have a full understanding of the expectations placed on them in order to keep people safe from fire.
“Inspecting officers worked closely with Dr Shin to ensure the hotel was brought up to a minimum standard of fire safety but he continued to ignore the serious nature of this case. We will always seek to prosecute those who persistently fail to protect others in order to ensure that those people who may be working or staying at a hotel are kept safe.”
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Study: Quarter of firms ‘don’t undertake regular safety checks’ on vehicle fleets
Regular safety checks on vehicle fleets are not being conducted by a quarter of businesses, research has claimed.

The study by TomTom Telematics, which surveyed senior managers at 400 UK-based firms, also found only 43% checked license and insurance documentation more than once every six months.

But on a positive note, 89% of managers did check driver documentation, regardless of time period.

Some 15% of respondents said organisations only checked documentation when a new employee joined – and did not schedule follow-up checks.

Beverley Wise, the UK & Ireland director at TomTom Telematics, said: “Ensuring vehicles and drivers are roadworthy is a fundamental requirement for any organisation that expects employees to drive for business purposes.

“If organisations are to safeguard employees and protect themselves from risk, it is important to have comprehensive systems in place not only for ensuring checks are conducted frequently but also to ensure findings are properly recorded and acted upon where necessary.”
Manual checks

There was also a lack of technology involved in safety checks on vehicles. Three-fifths of those surveyed, who check driver documentation, still do it manually – with the remainder conducting electronic checks.

In the specific case of companies operating grey fleets – vehicles owned by employees but used for business purposes – 21% do not conduct any checks on drivers’ insurance documentation.

Wise added: “Since the paper counterpart to the photocard licence was abolished more than two years ago, endorsements and disqualifications have only been recorded electronically.

“Therefore, businesses should strongly consider moving from manual to electronic checks to ensure they are building a more comprehensive picture on driver risk.”
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Hotel owner prosecuted over ‘death trap’

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Hotel owner prosecuted over ‘death trap’
Man charged over 12 offences

03 August 2017

Fire Safety Signs & Notices Fire Risk Assessment

The landlord of a hotel in Morecombe, Lancashire, has admitted to twelve offences relating to placing people at risk of death and serious injury, after a number of fire safety defects were found at the property.

As a result of a complaint to Lancashire County Council, Sunny’s Inn in Morecambe, was visited by Lancashire Fire and Rescue Service (LFRS) and County Strategic, Lancaster City Council Environmental Health and Principal Housing Options.

Investigators found that several people were staying at the time, with two being long term residents and other short term residents staying for varying periods.

They found that a smoke detector in one of the bedrooms was covered with a plastic bag, and in another bedroom, the smoke detector was covered by a sock, meaning any smoke from a fire would not be detected at an early stage.

Fire doors were wedged open with fire extinguishers, meaning a fire could spread easily throughout the rooms.

The ‘dumb waiter’ was wedged open, meaning any fire on the ground floor could quickly spread to upper floors through the dumb waiter shaft.

A cardboard box was left in an escape corridor which could have tripped residents’ trying to escape and could have also caught fire.

Some of the doors to the bedrooms would not close, therefore making it easier for fire to spread.

Landlord Syed Masood Ahmed had previously received a number of fire safety notices but continued to allow the premises to be used for sleeping accommodation.

Mr Ahmed pleaded guilty to twelve offences at Lancaster Magistrates Court.
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The landlord of a house where two people had to be rescued from an early morning blaze has been given a suspended sentence and ordered to pay over £35,000 in fine and costs after breaking fire safety rules.

Mr Mark Jackson, prosecuting on behalf of West Midland Fire Service, outlined a catalogue of ‘woefully inadequate failure’ that had put lives at risk.

He said fire doors were either missing or ineffective; there was no emergency lighting on the first floor and only two domestic smoke alarms which had not been maintained and were only tested once a year.

There was neither fire resistant glazing nor signage detailing the escape route people should take in the event of fire.

Mr Jackson said: "There was significant risk of death or serious injury as a result of these failures some of which were nothing more than common sense measures. These were not isolated breaches."

A prohibition order was placed on the property banning its use by tenants until fire safety had been brought up to scratch.

Mr Salwinder Sangha, owner of the property which was made up of living quarters over a shop, borrowed £20,000 and complied with all the fire service's demands while also employing a letting agent.

He admitted six breaches of fire safety regulations and received a four month jail sentence suspended for 18 months.

He was also ordered to pay a £25,000 fine with £10,130 costs inside a year or face a further 12 months imprisonment in default.

Original source

Express and Star
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Now that's what you call a Fine...

£14.8m cost for ‘disastrous’ failings in falling window pane case

Construction firm Lendlease has been ordered to pay out £14.8m by the High Court after a London city tower was forced to be reclad for a second time because of falling glass panes on to the street below.

The ruling ends a long legal battle surrounding the former London Stock Exchange tower, now known as 125 Old Broad Street, where on one occasion a 15ft plate glass window fell from the 17th floor onto a busy street just missing office workers.

In total, 17 plate glass windows failed on the 26-storey tower forcing its owner to pay to reclad the building, just four years after Lendlease had completed its original renovation project.

Handing down his judgment last week, Mr Justice Stuart-Smith described the project’s failings as “disastrous”.
Glazing failures

Lendlease first carried out the extensive redevelopment of 125 Old Broad Street under a two-year design and build contract, completing in 2008.

Between then and 2012, the building suffered 17 spontaneous glazing failures due to nickel sulphide levels in the glass. Fortunately, no one was seriously injured by falling glass, but the building had to be cloaked in scaffolding to protect the public.

Owners Hammerson, the Bank of Ireland and GE Real Estate then took the decision to pay for the building to be reclad with a new glass curtain walling system in 2013.

The judge said that Lendlease had failed to ensure it had the sufficient documents to prove the glazing supplied had been properly heat-treated to prevent failure.
Not treated properly

He said: “I find as a fact that a substantial proportion of the glass that was used on 125 OBS, probably in the region of 35-40% though possibly more, was not heat soaked in accordance with the requirements of the contract.

“If it had all been heat soaked properly, there would probably have been either no breakages or one breakage.”

Around £8.7m of the £14.7m award covers the reglazing cost, with other remedial works and financing charges making up the balance.
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A care home company in Cheshire has been fined £50,000 after admitting to serious breaches of fire safety regulations, reports ITV.

Four Seasons (No 9) Ltd plead guilty to two breaches of the Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005, at its Cypress Court Care Home.

An audit was completed on the premises in 2016 following a complaint from a relative of a resident.

Upon inspection, deficiencies were found relating to compartmentation, means of fire detection and warning, means of escape, and evacuation procedures were found, putting the lives of people at risk.

Fire Mark Abram, protection manager at Cheshire Fire and Rescue Service, "The safety of people living, visiting and working in all premises such as this is of paramount importance.

“Establishments where people sleep and may need assistance to get out in the event of a fire are especially significant and fire safety must be treated as a priority.”

In a statement to ITV, Four Seasons Care Homes said: "The safety and wellbeing of the people in our care and of our staff is our foremost consideration and we regret that there were breaches of fire safety regulations at Cypress Court.

“These were identified during a routine inspection by Cheshire Fire & Rescue Service in 2016 and have all been rectified to their satisfaction.

“There was no fire and Cheshire Fire Authority did not consider the situation serious enough to warrant restriction on using any part of the home while the improvements were completed.

"We accept responsibility, but it is important to explain the context. The home was purpose built in 1996 and complied with relevant building regulations. Cheshire Fire & Rescue Service had inspected the premises on a number of previous occasions, including a Fire Safety Audit in 2012. There had been no material change to the building nor its use in the years to 2016 when fire safety deficiencies were identified for the first time.

"It is accepted that there was no element of the company putting ‘profit before safety’ in this case. This was an isolated historical event. We have invested heavily in fire risk management and improvement works.

“Prior to 2016, we had already engaged specialist contractors to carry out a detailed fire risk assessment of each of our homes. Cypress Court was scheduled to be assessed and the deficiencies would have been identified and rectified.

“However, the Cheshire Fire & Rescue Service carried out their inspection prior to our scheduled assessment."
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A man from Kings Lynn, Lincolnshire, has been slapped with a huge £75,000 fine for a string of serious fire safety breaches.

Mr Paul Turner was ordered to pay the fine after being convicted of five fire safety, and eight housing offences.

The fire safety breaches included:

Failing to review the fire risk assessment
Escape routes not adequately protected in case of fire
Locked fire exit
Blocked fire escape route
Dangerous and inadequate electrical installation

When fire and council officers visited the property in early 2016, they found at least 18 occupants, including two very young children at the property.

Mr Turner denied he was running an HMO, but said it was a hotel with paying guests. He did not have a licence to operate an HMO and the premises were not of a suitable standard to operate as a hotel.

Dan Moss, prevention and protection manager at Lincolnshire Fire and Rescue said: “Landlords have a responsibility to keep their tenants safe from fire and if they are ignoring those responsibilities and putting people at risk, we will not hesitate to prosecute.

When officers visited the property in February, they found at least 18 people living there, with two very young children aged one and two - we needed to take immediate action to ensure their safety.

“The penalty imposed on Mr Turner is a clear reminder to landlords that the court’s take safety as seriously as we do and the penalties for not doing are severe.”
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