I would like to thank Rob for his excellent expertise and assistance with Health and Safety issues. He was extremely efficient with answering any queries and delivering the required documents very quickly! Would certainly recommend this company and will be using these services again in the future. HVC Ltd

Clearwater Safety Group Limited provide professional but realistic business risk management advice to SME’s across East and West Sussex and Hampshire, through Surrey into South London and over into Essex and Kent.

We have four divisions:

Clearwater safety Clearwater fire Clearwater events Clearwater business

Clearwater Safety specialises in general health & safety which includes construction, CDM and training.

Clearwater Fire carries out Fire Risk Assessments, Fire Management Strategies, determines alarm equirements and associated activities.

Clearwater Events help organisers of public events with their safety management, including working with SAG’s.

Clearwater Business works with directors to create business continuity or disaster recovery plans.

The Clearwater Safety Group firmly believes that the management and control of risks belong at the very core of all business activities. Looking after the health and well-being of your staff makes sound business sense – less time off due to sickness or injuries, no need to train replacement staff, and no fines or compensation payments. Planning for the unexpected is looking after your business.

 

Mission Statement

Clearwater Safety specialises in general health & safety which includes construction, CDM and training.Clearwater Fire carries out Fire Risk Assessments, Fire Management Strategies, determines alarm requirements and associated activities. Clearwater Events help organisers of public events with their safety management, including working with SAG’s. Clearwater Business works with directors to create business continuity or disaster recovery plans. The Clearwater Safety Group firmly believes that the management and control of risks belong at the very core of all business activities. Looking after the health and well-being of your staff makes sound business sense – less time off due to sickness or injuries, no need to train replacement staff, and no fines or compensation payments. Planning for the unexpected is looking after your business.

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When will companies learn - pedestrians and moving vehicles do not work well together in the same space...

£180k fine after transport worker crushed
A worker who suffered fatal crush injuries had become trapped between two heavy goods vehicles while working on site for a transport company. Colin Lawson Transport Limited has been fined £180,000.

Graham Forsyth was fatally injured in the incident, which happened in May 2016. The HSE’s investigation revealed that the company had failed to provide a safe system of work and adequate training for their staff.

At Aberdeen Sheriff Court, Colin Lawson Transport Limited pleaded guilty to breaching Section 2 and Section 33(1) (a) of the Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974 and was fined £180,000.

Speaking after the hearing, HSE inspector Connor Gibson commented: “This incident could have been prevented if the company had put a safe system of work in place when moving vehicles.”

“Companies should be aware that HSE will not hesitate to take appropriate enforcement action against those that fall below the required standards.”
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A catalogue of errors caused this. The edge protection was the final straw...

A construction company has been sentenced after an employee fell from the first floor of a school in Wakefield.

On 26 August 2014, the 61-year-old worker was asked to remove fall bags from the first floor of Sandal Endowed Primary School. The bags were too bulky to fit safely down the stairs. He took the bags to the roof and proceeded to throw them over the edge. One of the bags became caught on the edge protection, dislodging it and taking both him and the edge protection over the edge.

The employee fell and landed on the unprotected end of a scaffolding pole resulting in broken ribs and internal injuries, and later removal of part of his bowel due to infection.

The HSE’s investigation found that George Hurst & Sons Ltd failed to implement the British Standard for edge protection.

George Hurst & Sons Limited of Don Pottery Yard, Rowms Lane, Swinton, pleaded guilty to breaching Section 2(1) of the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 and as the company have gone into administration has been fined £1.

After the hearing, HSE inspector Yolande Burns commented: “This accident would not have happened if the standard had been met. The breaches were ongoing for a period and many other employees were exposed to the risk of falling over the edge of the building.

“Falls from height remain one of the most common causes of work related injuries in this country and the risks associated with working at height are well known.”
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Tyre-related deaths and injuries preventable say Highways England and Bridgestone
Almost three quarters of motorway incidents related to tyre failure could be prevented if drivers carry out simple checks, according to new research released today by Highways England and tyre company Bridgestone.
More than 30 people were killed or seriously injured in motorway accidents in 2016 due to illegal or faulty tyres. But an 18-month study says commuters, commercial drivers and other road users can do a lot more to help reduce accidents through regular checking.

Richard Leonard, Highways England’s head of road safety, said: “England’s motorways are the safest in the world but we’re determined to reduce the number of people killed and seriously injured on them.

“This important research confirms our view that road users must play a bigger role and get into the habit of checking tyre pressures and tread depths and looking out for nails and other debris stuck in tyres before setting out on journeys. These simple checks could save lives.”

Tyresafe

Unveiled yesterday (24 April) at the annual Commercial Vehicle Show at Birmingham’s NEC, the research reveals that almost three quarters of tyre failure samples analysed by Bridgestone involved poor inflation or debris penetration issues – problems which could be potentially avoided with better tyre husbandry.

Both Bridgestone and Highways England, the government company for operating, maintaining and improving the country’s motorways and major A roads, are partners in the multi-agency road safety charity Tyresafe. They worked together to carry out the research over 18 months between the beginning of 2016 and last summer.

During the project, staff working for Highways England at depots across the West Midlands provided more than 1,000 pieces of tyre debris from motorways to a technical engineering team from Bridgestone to analyse.

The findings from 1035 tyre segments retrieved from the M1, M6, M40, M5 and M42 revealed:

56% of tyres failed due to road/yard debris penetration
18% failed due to poor inflation
8% failed due to poor vehicle maintenance
1% of tyres failed due to manufacturing defects
1% of tyres failed due to excessive heat
16% of the tyres couldn’t be specified to one particular problem
The tyre debris was taken from cars, vans, commercial vehicles and motorbikes, with under-inflation of tyres a key theme, along with poor vehicle maintenance, both of which accounted for 26% of the entire sample. When considering that 32 people were killed or seriously injured in motorway road traffic accidents in 2016 due to ‘illegal, defective or underinflated tyres’ Bridgestone and Highways England say simple tyre checks save lives.

In addition, the cost to the economy from a 2-hour delay on a busy stretch of motorway following a 2-lane closure stands at £135,360 and a massive £1,488,960 for a 3-lane closure lasting up to four hours .

Some of the samples were particularly alarming, with a temporary ‘space-saver’ spare tyre being run to destruction, while a number of potentially lethal and illegal ‘string’ repairs were also found on car tyres, which are completely unsuitable at any speed, let alone 70mph speeds on motorways.

Bridgestone technical manager Gary Powell, who oversaw the analysis of the debris with field engineer Peter Moulding and the rest of the firm’s technical department, said: “This report has taken a great deal of time and effort, involving a painstaking process of collecting tyre debris over 18 months and analysing it in depth thereafter. In conclusion, some simple tyre checks can save lives, not to mention reduce the risk of a stressful breakdown on a motorway.

“With proper vehicle inspection and maintenance programs, many of the failure methods noted should be detectable and preventable. In light of these results, we would also advise that tyre pressure monitoring systems (TPMS) are fitted to vehicles which don’t benefit from this technology already. It will assist with the detection of penetrations and deflations.”
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This was completely preventable.

Horrific injuries due to DSEAR failures
A company specialising in spray foam insulation services has been fined after an inexperienced worker suffered severe burns while attempting to refuel petrol powered equipment.
On 11 January 2015, workers at Greenseal Insulation Ltd were spraying insulation into a ceiling cavity of a retail outlet. The foam spraying equipment was installed in a van parked outside the premises. When foam ceased from the spray gun, one of the operatives entered the van to refuel the equipment. A jerry can was fixed with straps within the compartment containing a compressor and generator (both petrol operated). The worker took the jerry can, opened it and petrol sprayed all over him and the compartment. Ignition followed immediately, covering him in flames.

Coma
Following the event he was in a coma in hospital for three months and subsequently spent over a year in hospital.

Investigating, the HSE found that Greenseal failed to ensure that risk from dangerous substances, namely petrol, was either eliminated or reduced so far as is reasonably practicable.

The HSE advise that in order to minimise the risk, the company could have taken a number of reasonably practicable actions, including the use of diesel powered spray foam equipment or reducing the frequency of refuelling by installing a larger fuel tank or tanks. Refilling could then be reduced to once a day and taken place at the beginning of the day when the equipment was cool and not in operation.

The potential for spilling petrol could have been reduced by storing it away from sources of heat and confining it to smaller containers or by using a non-spilling fuel delivery nozzle.

Fined
Greenseal Insulation Ltd of 45 Wycombe Road, Birmingham, B28 9EN pleaded guilty to breaching Regulation 6 of the Dangerous Substances and Explosive Atmospheres Regulations (DSEAR) 2002. The company was fined £40,000 and ordered to pay costs of £11,779.

Speaking after the hearing HSE inspector Gabriella Dimitrov said: “This was the worker’s second day on the job. He suffered horrific injuries due to the company’s failure to adequately consider the risks from refuelling and implementing safer alternatives to the system of work requiring refuelling petrol powered equipment every two hours.”
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Don't blame elf and safety. This is ridiculous!!!😡

HSE blasts school tree felling decision
The Health and Safety Executive has criticised schools that “hide behind non-existent” healthy and safety regulations, after a primary school was given the green light to fell a 150-year old chestnut true.

St John’s Primary School in Knaphill, Surrey, won the right to cut down the 18-metre high tree, following a meeting of Woking Borough Council’s planning committee last month when a proposed tree preservation order was rejected.
Headteacher’s claims

The committee reports show that the school’s headteacher, Sarah May, had written to the councillors, objecting to the order, partly on the grounds of health and safety.

According to the committee report, Ms May said area surrounding the tree has to be closed to the removal fallen chestnuts in order to “ensure the health and safety of the children”.

And her letter also warned leafs from the tree cause a “slip hazard if left on the ground” and bird droppings have caused “an impact on the provision for children within the play area”.
HSE comment

But commenting on the issue, a spokesperson for the HSE said: “It seems school and councils still regularly hide behind non-existent health and safety regulations to excuse all kinds of questionable decisions. “Through initiatives like Mythbusters, the public are increasingly aware that health and safety is simply used as a catch all phrase in these cases, and people who make these decisions increasingly open themselves up to ridicule.

“Here at HSE, we like to think that chestnuts have fallen from trees for millennia and leaves do indeed get wet and slippery, it is nature, and is likely continue for some time yet! However, while it is nature, it certainly isn’t health and safety, which is a set of laws designed to prevent death, serious injury and ill-health in the workplace, not eradicate any risk at all from people’s lives.”
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Prison sentence and £50,000 fine in roof fall case

A Preston egg production company and a joinery sub-contractor have been fined after a worker fell through a roof.
The employee of T& J Leigh had been helping the joinery contractor Harry Jackson to re-roof an old feed mill building when he fell five metres through a gap, to the concrete floor below causing serious head and arm injuries.

Investigating the incident, which took place at Ghyll View Farm in Longton on 1 November 2016, the HSE found the roof work was not properly planned with no measures in place to prevent or mitigate a fall through or from the roof.

T & J Leigh (a partnership) of Ghyll View Farm pleaded guilty to breaching Section 2(1) of the Health and Safety at Work etc act 1974 and was fined a total of £50,000 with costs of £2,855.32.

Harry Jackson of Much Hoole pleaded guilty to breaching Section 3 (2) of the Health and Safety at Work etc act 1974 and was given a 16 week prison sentence, suspended for 12 months. He was also ordered to carry out 150 hours unpaid work and pay costs of £2,855.32.

Speaking after the hearing, HSE inspector Steven Boyd said: “This avoidable incident resulted in serious injuries, a fall from this distance could easily have been fatal.

“Roof work should always be properly planned with measures put in place to prevent a dangerous fall.

“Companies commissioning roof work should make reasonable checks regarding the competence of a contractor to undertake work at height safely”
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£100k fine after apprentice falls from scaffold
A scaffolding company has been sentenced for safety breaches after a 16-year-old apprentice joiner fell approximately four metres from a scaffold platform.

Sheffield Magistrates’ Court was told how, on 6 September 2016, the apprentice was passing roof tiles from the loading bay to a colleague on the scaffold when he caught his foot in a gap between the scaffold platform and the loading bay. The apprentice fell backwards under a single guard rail to the ground below, sustaining injuries including a fractured cheekbone, broken wrist and injuries to his ribs. He also required 13 stitches for a deep cut above his left eye.

The HSE’s investigation found that the loading bay edge protection did not include an intermediate guard-rail or toe board.

Bland Scaffolding Ltd of Old Ship House, Wath Road, Elsecar pleaded guilty to breaching Regulation 8(a) of the Work at Height Regulations 2005 and was fined £100,000 and ordered to pay £918 in costs.

After the hearing, HSE inspector Trisha Elvy commented: “This case highlights the importance of following well known industry guidance to design and erect scaffolding in a safe manner, a fall from this height could have easily been fatal.”
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6 months ago

Clearwater Safety Group Ltd

Oh dear. Saw these guys this morning in central London decorating a tree. I'm not sure but I don't think having a ladder horizontally counts as a proper platform lol🤔 ... See MoreSee Less

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6 months ago

Clearwater Safety Group Ltd

Quality domestic scaffolding...🤔 ... See MoreSee Less

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A testimonial from a satisfied client to my colleague who introduced me.

I am writing to express my thanks for your kind introduction to Rob Slater of Clearwater Safety Group Limited. We have enjoyed the benefit of the services of Airtight for many years now and this introduction was very welcome. As the individual in charge of Health & Safety for my firm, I felt the need for a review of our existing policies and procedures with regards to Health & Safety. With up to 85 staff in our offices at any one time, this is an area of great importance. At our initial meeting, Rob was able to give me very clear guidance on the legal requirements and demonstrated excellent technical competence in his field. Rob followed up on that meeting and gave me a concise quotation covering the areas of our policies and procedures that needed to be addressed. Crucially, as part of his engagement. Rob acts as a named ‘Competent Person’ as required by law, which is reassuring for me as a business owner. In my dealings with Rob, I have found him to be punctual, reliable and importantly, very practical given the context of our ‘low risk’ office environment. I would have no hesitation in continuing to recommend the services of both Airtight and Clearwater to my business contacts. With kind regards Yours sincerely, Craig Manser BSc(Hons) ACA
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